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I keep a long-form blog about VC and Startups but want to give Tumblr a try.

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I often tell people that to maximize viral adoption of your blog posts that you should consider 2 Tweets. I usually do East Coast / West Coast. I try to vary copy but make it clear to people that it’s the same post so people don’t click twice.
I tell people all the time that it doubles conversion. Here’s a graphic from Chartbeat (real time analytics, which I love, but am not an investor) showing the effects. This is at one moment in time, which is what ChartBeat is great at. By the end of the day this post will likely see 4-5k viewers if a garden-variety post.
You can see the West Coast Tweet (just went out) has already outperformed the earlier Tweet that has died down from East Coast time. 
Why? Because Twitter is ephemeral. Anybody who logged in at 9:00am West Coast and follows enough people wouldn’t have seen my Tweet from 3 hours prior.
The two links in green are: 1) a Tweet that I sent late, late last night. When I do this I delete the Tweet before I go to bed. Don’t like having 3 Tweets out there. But when I’m up late and want to discuss with people in comments section sometimes I like to drive a few readers there late night. You get an interested (and undistracted) crowd and 2) organic people on the blog.
So, how do I track all of this? Using awe.sm (I’m an investor). It let’s you track each individual URL separately so as a marketer you can track: copy, channel (Twitter, FB, Tumblr, email, website, etc.), time-of-day and even person who drives the most shares.

I often tell people that to maximize viral adoption of your blog posts that you should consider 2 Tweets. I usually do East Coast / West Coast. I try to vary copy but make it clear to people that it’s the same post so people don’t click twice.

I tell people all the time that it doubles conversion. Here’s a graphic from Chartbeat (real time analytics, which I love, but am not an investor) showing the effects. This is at one moment in time, which is what ChartBeat is great at. By the end of the day this post will likely see 4-5k viewers if a garden-variety post.

You can see the West Coast Tweet (just went out) has already outperformed the earlier Tweet that has died down from East Coast time. 

Why? Because Twitter is ephemeral. Anybody who logged in at 9:00am West Coast and follows enough people wouldn’t have seen my Tweet from 3 hours prior.

The two links in green are: 1) a Tweet that I sent late, late last night. When I do this I delete the Tweet before I go to bed. Don’t like having 3 Tweets out there. But when I’m up late and want to discuss with people in comments section sometimes I like to drive a few readers there late night. You get an interested (and undistracted) crowd and 2) organic people on the blog.

So, how do I track all of this? Using awe.sm (I’m an investor). It let’s you track each individual URL separately so as a marketer you can track: copy, channel (Twitter, FB, Tumblr, email, website, etc.), time-of-day and even person who drives the most shares.

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